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Hard Drive (HDD) VS. Solid-State Drive (SSD)



Let’s get to know the difference between these two options when purchasing a new computer.


WHAT IS A HARD DRIVE (HDD)?

Your hard drive is where you store your data. It’s where we save our pictures and documents, and it’s where we download and install our programs. Your hard drive stores data long-term, which stays there even when your computer is turned off.

One common term that people tend to use incorrectly is memory. Your computer memory is essentially short-term memory where data is stored as the processor needs it. It’s a bit confusing, but the point is that where you store your data is not called memory. It’s called a hard drive.


Most computers that we see for repairs have what is called a “mechanical” hard drive. The name references  the fact that there is a spinning mechanical disk inside the drive enclosure. 


Unfortunately, this means there are a lot of little parts inside your hard drive that can easily be damaged, especially if you drop your computer! We won’t get into too much detail now, because I’m sure you’re already rolling our eyes saying, “Get on with it!”


WHAT IS A SOLID-STATE DRIVE (SSD)?


A solid-state drive, or SSD abbreviated, is a much safer and more reliable hard drive to use. They are smaller and lighter. They are less likely to be damaged and data is written directly onto a semiconductor chip, instead of a mechanical disk, making it much faster and more reliable. More and more computers are using them. They are more expensive than a mechanical hard drive, but prices have quickly been coming down.


TECH PARTNER TIP: SAVE YOUR MONEY AND GET A COMPUTER WITH A SOLID-STATE DRIVE FROM THE BEGINNING.


When we talk about storage, whether mechanical or solid-state, the next thing we think about is size. How much space will we need? It depends on the individual. SSDs are more expensive, so if you don’t need to store much data on your computer, it’s best to go with lower amounts, such as 128GB or 256GB. It can start to get pretty expensive when we start talking about 512GB or 1TB.

*Note GB stands for GIGABYTE and TB stands for TERRABYTE

Our advice would be to determine how you’ll be using your new computer.

  • If you only use your computer for the internet and need to save a picture or document here or there, go for a 128GB or 256GB SSD.

  • If you are using your computer for work or school and need space on your hard drive for pictures, documents, and/or videos, go for a 512GB or 1TB SSD.

If you need more information on your computer’s storage, feel free to contact us. We’ll go into greater detail about your needs to ensure you’re making the best decision. We want to be sure you get what you NEED and not just what someone wants to sell you.



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